ACJELL-Welcome


Welcome to ACJELL!

ACJELL (American College Journal of English Language and Literature) was started in 2012 with a view to providing an easily accessible platform to teachers and research scholars of English language and literature for publication of their research papers. Their areas of research mainly focus on language teaching, textual analysis, cultural studies, and literary theories. They lack opportunities for sharing their research articles with the international audience for validation. Thus, ACJELL promotes original critical thinking, academic research writing, and publication culture among them.

Its founding fathers are Dr S. Stanley Mohandoss Stephen, the then Head of the Postgraduate and Research Department of English and Dr. G. Dominic Savio, the then Head of the Undergraduate Department of English & the Dean for Curriculum Development and Research at the American College, Madurai. The first issue was released by the then Vice-Chancellor of Madurai Kamaraj University, Dr. Kalyani Mathivanan and she observed during the inaugural function in September 2012 that “a journal is sustained by the citations it receives.” Right from its inception, it has been steadily receiving articles from
postgraduate and research scholars, an ideal that founding fathers set.

Research culture of conducting exploratory and confirmatory experiments in the field of English language teaching and deconstructing literary texts with appropriate theoretical tools needs to be instilled in the researchers. Original, critical response to literary texts and language teaching issues must replace the old, well-received ways of recycling the accepted views about the issues. New critical tools, such as postcolonial reading, postmodernist reading, new historicist reading, cultural materialist reading, psychoanalytic reading, and transcultural reading are a few among a vast galaxy of theories that question the conventional notions about very many notions, such as self, power, text, writer, author, reader, reading, selfhood, subject, god, meaning, and the like that are taken for granted without any critical interrogation. Similarly, in English language teaching in Indian context, every other teacher is confronted with a host of issues that are elusive in learners’ attempt to increase their English language proficiency.They may range from materials, methods of teaching, approaches to language, trained manpower to language teaching theories that are uncritically received, accepted, and assumed as relevant to Indian learners.

ACJEEL is a double blind, peer reviewed international annual journal with ISSN 1725 2278 876X.